New York’s Foreclosure Settlement Conference Program

New York’s Foreclosure Settlement Conference program provides court oversight to the mortgage modification process. The goal is to insure that the borrower timely submits the necessary information for the bank to make a modification determination. More importantly for the borrower, the program gives the bank some accountability for receiving the necessary information and for making a timely decision.

Only borrowers who are defendants in a foreclosure lawsuit are eligible for the program. After the bank serves the borrower with the summons and complaint, the bank is obliged to file with the court a form that notifies the court’s clerk to send the parties notice of the first conference. The conference takes place at the courthouse but not in a courtroom, although the borrower may be waiting in a courtroom for the borrower’s case to be called. When the case is called, the borrower will be escorted into a private room. The borrower, the borrower’s lawyer (if the borrower has one), the bank’s lawyer and a state employee who is not a judge are the only people in the room. There is no court reporter or clerk. The bank’s lawyer will give the state employee some basic information about the loan like the type of loan (fixed or adjustable rate, etc.), when the last payment was made and the outstanding principal balance. The state employee will then discuss with the borrower the reasons for the default and whether the borrower wants to retain the property. Assuming the borrower wants to remain in the property, the bank’s lawyer will provide the borrower with some forms to complete and a list of documents to submit. The forms ask for the borrower’s income, expenses, and assets. The documents normally include bank statements, pay stubs, tax returns and a current utility bill. The borrower will also have to submit a hardship affidavit explaining the financial hardship that caused the borrower to default. The hardship affidavit is often one of the forms for the borrower to complete but sometimes the borrower must provide it separately.

The next conference is normally scheduled at the conclusion of the first conference. The borrower should submit the forms and documents before the next conference. The subsequent conferences will address any requests the bank has for additional information or any questions about the information submitted. The length of the process normally requires the borrower to periodically submit updated paystubs and bank statements.

About Christopher Brown

I'm a partner in the Westport, Connecticut and Bronxville, New York law firm of Begos Horgan & Brown LLP. Since 2008, I have spent much of my time defending consumers and businesses in foreclosure cases in Connecticut and New York. I have had two foreclosure actions dismissed for Connecticut clients and prevented a lender from benefiting from a tax foreclosure. As of May 2011, I am representing a client in an appeal to the Connecticut Supreme Court involving standing to foreclose and the viability of MERS mortgages.
Foreclosure Alternatives, Foreclosure Process, Mortgage Modification ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>